Conference Call Transcript – Paulie Malignaggi, Pablo Cesar Cano, Hassan N’Dam & Peter Quillin

Kelly Swanson

Okay, thanks so much, everybody, for joining us. And again, here we are in our second back-to-back international media conference call for October 20th world title fight extravaganza, the inaugural night of boxing from the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, and it will be televised live on Showtime. So we’re going to do similar to what we did yesterday, joining us now is Hassan N’Dam, the WBO Middleweight World Champion; and Peter Quillin, the number one rated WBO Middleweight contender, and then after they’re done we will be joined by Paulie Malignaggi and Pablo Ceasar Cano. And I’m going to turn the call over now to Robert Diaz, who will make the formal comments before we open it up to the fighters. Robert?

Robert Diaz

Thank you very much, Kelly, and thanks to everybody for being on this call. To the four fighters, I thank you for taking the time. October 20th, Brooklyn, after 80 years since their last world title fight it’s back at the Barclays, a brand new stadium.

We’re very excited, four world title fights, plus a great line-up on the under card: former World Champion, Luis Collazzo; undefeated rising Junior Middleweight star, Eddie Gomez; former World Title contender from Brooklyn Dmitriy Salita and of course a young prospect Boyd Melson. Four world title fights in one night. The main event: Danny Garcia against Erik Morales and Paulie “The Magic Man” Malignaggi defending his title against Pablo Cesar Cano. And we have right now with us the current World Champion, Hassan N’Dam, and the number one and undefeated, Peter “Kid Chocolate” Quillin.

We’re very excited. We’re very happy to be bringing this to you. I want to thank them our sponsors Corona, Dewalt Tools, and AT&T. And of course this is on Showtime Championship Boxing, top level boxing. Tickets are still available for $300, $200, $100, and $50, and they’re available for purchase at BarclaysCenter.com and ticketmaster.com.

At this moment I’d like to introduce to you the number one, undefeated, 27-0, 20 knockouts, from Manhattan, Peter “Kid Chocolate” Quillin. Peter, would you like to say an opening statement, please.

Peter Quillin

Yes, I want to thank you all for having me on this media call. It’s a pleasure. I just left the gym working out, getting a hard day of workout so I’ll be able to give you all aggressive answers for your questions, and I’m very blessed to be here. Thank you to Golden Boy, and Al Haymon and my management.

Diaz

Also with us on this call is the current WBO Middleweight World Champion, undefeated as well, two undefeated fighters putting it on the line, Hassan N’Dam.

Hassan N’Dam

I am very happy to come to New York, in Brooklyn, and for this big show with a very big fight. I am just very happy. I am not concerned about fighting in the United States because I am the champion and I am sure of myself. I think it will be a great fight against Peter Quillin.

Q

Hey, Peter. Just a general question to you, you’re going to be fighting in Brooklyn, a historic night. Paulie Malignaggi said growing up in Brooklyn that he always wanted to fight in Madison Square Garden, and he got that opportunity, but it’s even more important to be on the first boxing match at Barclays, which he hoped years from now people will look at as sort of a boxing Mecca. From your standpoint, is it important for you as an undefeated fighter to win a title and perhaps go down in history as making a mark for boxing in your town?

P. Quillin

I believe that is the case. I’m carrying the name of a ring legend, “Kid Chocolate,” who was originally from Cuba, who transported himself to New York City and became one of the biggest draws in New York City. Now, I’ve made myself a big name in New York and I’m working very hard, very, very hard, and being part of this historic event is a blessing in disguise. I’m now all about working on my legacy and my name in boxing, so yes, I would say making myself a champion in Brooklyn is my first start to that.

Q

It’s such a big night being in one of four championship bouts, do you feel any pressure, any intimidation to be among names on this card?

P. Quillin

But this pressure would not get to me fighting in Brooklyn. I’ve been in guys’ backyard and was the underdog. I’ve been the underdog since the beginning and always had to prove myself. But this time it’s just all about the same kinds of things that I’m used to, so there’s no pressure at all. I’m 27-0, with 20 healthy knockouts, and I’m very blessed with that, so this fight right here is going to dignify me as the champ that I want to be.

Q

Saturday night is your first world title chance. I know you’ve been waiting on it. How nervous are you going into the fight next Saturday night?

P. Quillin

I had one of the best camps ever in this camp, because this is my moment right here. This is my challenger. And I have to have no doubts about myself, about my skills going into the ring October 20th to win my title. This is my title. This is a showcase for me, “Kid Chocolate.” This is not about Hassan. As you can tell, he’s on the phone talking, and then you know a little disrespectful, but to be a champ you have to be very respectful and I’m respectful of the champ, but come October 20th all the respect is gone.

Q

You mentioned the historical aspect of the use of the name, “Kid Chocolate.” At the end of October 20th, if you’re the new World Champion where do you see yourself in the middleweight class there?

P. Quillin

When I win my first world title it was going to be up to Golden Boy, Al Haymon, and my management, to bring the best opportunities my way. I let the fans label me what they want. I ask myself every day before training, I look in the mirror and I look deep in my eyes and I ask myself who’s going to value you more than you’re going to value yourself. And if the answer is nobody, but I’ll usually answer the question after I get done work, so I think my hard work takes me beyond the sky. The sky is not the limit. I think I can go beyond the sky with the hard work that I’m willing to put into boxing.

Q

After October 20th, if you win, do you see yourself in a fight with Sergio Martinez in 2013?

P. Quillin

Animals don’t think about who they’re going to fight against. That’s what I do. You put me in the pit, I’m in there with anybody.

Q

Hassan, how do you feel about fighting in Brooklyn and whether or not you will be able to keep your belts in Quillin’s backyard?

H. N’Dam

I understand. I have great respect and I respect all of my opponents. I am undefeated and I will remain undefeated on October 20. The fight is in Brooklyn and that is not a problem for me. Quillin can fight in Brooklyn in front of all of his fans and all of his friends, but when he steps into that ring, he will be alone. I will win and remain undefeated and keep the title.

Q

Hassan, you talked a little bit about fighting in Brooklyn. This will be of course your first fight in the United States, your first fight really out of France, and you’re fighting of course in one of the biggest, most historic cities, New York City. Do you feel added pressure fighting in New York City? Do you feel added pressure with your first fight outside of France? And how long have you been in the United States to become acclimatized, to become accustomed to the difference in temperature, work atmosphere, etc.

H. N’Dam

I came to the United States for the first time in my life, and he fight before an amateur and he make one fight in his professional career outside of his country. I have, no pressure, because for me to come in United States is the beginning of the new story, of the new adventure for me, because I am coming to the United States to win this fight and begin the new adventure in the United States.

Q

Okay. Thank you, gentlemen. And I have a question for Peter. Peter, you have a great background story, you know the kid off the street working three jobs at one time, struggling with your boxing career and finally making it almost to the top, where you’re at now. But you also have a strong faith in God and you talk a lot about God when you say thank you to people, when you talk about your career. Talk a little bit about your faith in God, how he provides you your substance when you’re in the ring.

P. Quillin

Well, I think for every fighter, a fighter fights with his personality. And I think with me I fight with all my heart, I fight with all my faith in God, meaning … in my heart, in my mind, I feel like I’m especially touched by God. It’s the reason why I’ve been through all of what I’ve been through and I never gave up through all that and I never came off and lost focus. Like the Book of Job, Job went through so much in his life where he never gave up, he never questioned his belief in God, so with this fight right here I think I’m going to let people know that I was born in Chicago, I was born to a Cuban immigrant, then moved to Grand Rapids, Michigan. My dad went to prison for seven years, and at the age of 18 I moved out of where my comfortabilities all were and moved to New York City with no family and started to prepare yself, keeping my faith in God through all this, sleeping on floors, doing whatever it takes to get to this point in my life right now. I look at Hassan, and I hear what he’s saying, he’s coming to here, but he’s so used to fighting in his backyard, his own home, where he doesn’t know how it feels to go to other places and conquer all places.

Like I said, my journey is not done. I went from New York City to California, where I was in the Wild Card Boxing Club, and I had to keep myself and make sure that I knew exactly what it was about, and it was all about me. It was not about anybody else, besides myself and what God is trying to do, and allow me to do. He loves winners. Winners are allowed to reach people, so me, through my story and being able to let people know that yes, I’m a boxer, I go in the ring and I fight physically, but everybody’s a fighter, in my opinion, anybody that goes and wants to be a writer, they try to be the best writer, so you’re fighting to be the best writer, or the promoters, you want to fight to be the best promoter.

So regardless I think the fight is in all of us, and in some of us we really don’t know, but I think the fight is in all of us. And I think Hassan is going to have to really dig deep in his heart to know that he’s coming to my backyard where one of the biggest, this is historic, this is historic not just for me but this is historic for him and also for the state of boxing and the state of Brooklyn, and the state of the U.S. Here I’m the best middleweight in the U.S. right now, do you know what I’m saying, so he’s going to need to come in, and like I said, and being a challenger to what we have to offer for him over here. And if he wants to be a winner, he’s got to understand that comes with a lot. That’s also coming with him learning English and being able to speak to the fans and being able to be out there and not just say you’re coming over here and this is your journey. Your journey is to inspire people, and that’s what “Kid Chocolate” is doing.

So I’m just letting you know, come October 20th you’re going to see a lot of personality in the ring. I don’t fight one way, so when guys get ready for me in one kind of fashion, one kind of way, I fight in different ways to my game.

Q

One thing I noticed when the fight was announced, you had a lot of other fighters, a lot of lower tier fighters in the other weight classes around your weight class throw a little hate towards you, saying you didn’t deserve a title fight so early in your career. How do you react to other fighters who say that about your opportunity?

P. Quillin

Well, I can say this, it’s negative and positive energy. Negative motivation is positive motivation. And positive motivation is, “Good job, Peter. We want to see you do the best.” And it’s the negative, “Oh, you can’t do it.” I use both as motivation for me. It’s motivation. For a guy that just came out of nowhere and to just be on top of his game, you’ve got to give some kind of credit to a guy like that. And the people that work Golden Boy, Al Haymon and my managers, all I do is keep my eyes on the prize.

I think N’Dam is more anxious to watch American TV, because it sounds like he’s got the TV playing in the background. When it comes to October 20th, Hassan, you’re not going to be passing the Grey Poupon, you’re going to be passing my belt over for me.

You’re going to be passing my belt around, homie. You’re not going to be passing the Grey Poupon you’re going to be passing my belt.

R. Diaz

All right, guys, thanks a lot to both of you for taking the time. See you guys out there next week.

Perfect. Thank you, everybody, once again. Well, it’s the second day of our two press conference calls that we’ve had and obviously one of the top fights that we have is a world title fight, WBA Welterweight Champion, Paulie “The Magic Man” Malignaggi returning to Brooklyn, New York, his home, defending his title against the always dangerous current world champion, WBA as well, Interim Champion at Super Lightweight, making another step up, Pablo Ceasar Cano, with a record of 26-1-1 and 20 knockouts.

First, let me introduce, to make some opening statements, the challenger, Pablo Ceasar Cano.

P. Cano

I want to thank everybody very much for being here. It’s a great honor to be on this call with you. I want to thank all the press and say hello, and I’m ready to go.

R. Diaz

And now “The Magic Man.” returning to Brooklyn with a record of 31-4, 7 Knockouts, currently the WBA Welterweight Champion, Paulie Malignaggi. Paulie?

P. Malignaggi

Hey, what’s up, guys? I’m ready to go too, so I guess that makes two of us. I have worked hard and I have definitely been looking forward to the opening of the Barclays Center for two years, ever since I signed with Golden Boy Promotions. So it feels good that it’s getting closer, it feels good that the moment is almost here, and I look forward to putting on a good show.

Q

A question for you, your last fight was probably the most aggressive fight in your entire career. You came out there and you had a knockout. Do you have that same sense going into that fight as well?

P. Malignaggi

You know, the last fight I didn’t really look to go for the knockout, it kind of just came. But that’s how I approach every fight. We’ve been working on a little bit more aggression in the gym with Eric Brown. I’ve always been a guy that had good legs and has been able to use my legs, but also develop an arsenal as far as things we can do to come forward as well and it will make me that much more of a well-rounded fighter. I just felt like I was able to step on the gas a little better when I needed to I can box when I need to, but if I need to come forward, if I start seeing my opponent weakening and I need to come forward, we can do that as well, or if there’s a lack of aggression on my opponent’s part I’ll be the one to come forward. I like to just be well-rounded. I like to have options. And the things we’ve been working on in the gym really give me those options, I can fight going forward and I can fight going backward and it’s a good thing for me.

Q

I noticed one thing about you since you lost to Amir Khan, that you started to use the right jab more and more. Is that the key to victory now.

P. Malignaggi

The right cross, you mean? Yes, it’s always been a situation for me where I haven’t had healthy hands, especially the right hand. I’ve always had a pretty good right hand, it’s just I haven’t been able to use it all that much consistently because I’ve broken it a lot. But it just happened to be that in the past couple of years it’s been healthy, it’s been good, and really if I’ve got healthy hands I can use them both, and when I can use them both it just makes me that much more dangerous.

Q

How does it feel to come back home?

P. Malignaggi

It feels great. It feels great, man. This is one of the main reasons I was happy to sign with Golden Boy two years ago, that I could be a part of this show and I could be a part of this event on a big stage in a big fight. And I was glad I did my job and Golden Boy did a tremendous job bringing me back, and now the moment is here and I’m ecstatic for it.

Q

All right, we’ll talk about that later. But listen, life is good for you right now, you’re getting ready to fight at Barclays Center and you’ve expressed to me how important to you to leave your mark in what could become boxing in the future, to have your name as one of the first people to fight here in your own hometown. You’re just coming off a really big, rejuvenating knockout in your career and you have these other things going on outside of boxing, so life is good, really. Can you talk about what all is going on positive in your life as opposed to some of the down times in your career.

P. Malignaggi

Yes, you know it’s funny when you surround yourself with positive people and you have a positive vibe around you and positive energy, so to speak, positive things happen. I haven’t always surrounded myself with the best people, at least the best people for me, and I’m not just talking about business, I’m talking on a personal level, you know, I haven’t always had such great people around me all the time. And I think that that black cloud can follow you around in the energy you surround yourself with.

I’ve just had a positive base for the past couple of years. After I lost to Amir Khan, it’s funny because the negative people, they eliminate themselves, you know. When you have a big loss like that you find out that negativity just kind of leaves you on its own because they don’t want to be around you unless they can grub off you, so it’s funny how they eliminated themselves and then things started turning around for me. And it feels really good that things are turning around for me, it feels really good that there’s a lot of positive things going on for me inside the ring and outside the ring. And it’s also funny when those same negative people try to squeeze their way back in the circle, and you kick them in their ass and kick them right back out.

Q

What does it say about you that you said to me before your last fight, you said to me, you don’t have to fight anymore, you’ve made investments. If you wanted to, you could walk away. What does it say to you about you, personally to yourself and to your fans, that you went to another country in a high risk fight, where a lot of people counted you out, and you scored an uncharacteristic knockout with a referee who uncharacteristically had to stop the fight?

P. Malignaggi

Yes. I think a lot of the talk about me being finished was overrated. A lot of the things that people say about me, the negative press is that I’m overrated, but in the end I think if you look, since I lost the Ricky Hatton fight I’ve had one bad performance in four years, and that was when I lost to Amir Khan. In the four years since I lost to Ricky Hatton one bad performance. The year I lost, Ricky Hatton had three bad performances, all in the same year. And I told everybody, do you know what, I just need to make a change and I’m going to be all right. And you know what, four years have passed and I’ve had one bad performance in four years. That’s not too bad.

I think the only thing that was overrated was what people were saying about me being finished and not having a bright future left and having my better days behind me and whatnot, because if you look at since the Ricky Hatton fight, beside that Amir Khan fight I barely lost any rounds. And I’m continuing to be dominant and I think it’s a testament to my mental strength, my mental fortitude and to my stubbornness, even.

Q

Are you a hungry fighter now, that’s number one. And are you a better fighter now than perhaps you have been in your career, and if so, in what way?

P. Malignaggi

I think I’m a better fighter because I’ve learned a lot of things and I’ve got a great team. And I think that makes me a better fighter. When you learn from your mistakes and … yourself with a great team and great people around you, I think that makes you a better fighter. The one regret is I didn’t have it around me when I was 25 or 26, because I think I would have been a monster, and I think I underachieved in that way. Better late than never, and even if I am 31, almost 32, I feel really good, and a lot of it has to do with the team I have around me and the people I have around me. They are positive and everybody working and doing their job, and I can do my job with less headaches. It really is a testament, again, to my stubbornness and to my mental fortitude.

I’d say I’m hungry, because I have a lot to prove, not so much to anybody else but more to myself. I feel like I underachieved a lot so I need to prove a lot more to myself. And as a world champion you have to stay hungry, because there are people coming for you, and I know my opponent is very hungry, he’s young and he’s got a bright future in front of him, but in order to make title defenses against a guy like this, you have to remain hungry yourself, and I’m very hungry.

Q

Last question for you, Paulie. This is a really tough game, it’s a game where one shot could change your life. You’re a guy who speaks well, you’re a guy who when you did your Showtime commentary people just loved it. Why are you still fighting? I’m just playing devil’s advocate, why keep fighting?

P. Malignaggi

I’ll tell you what, I don’t plan on fighting that much longer, but the reason I’m still fighting is because, again, like I said on the last question, I have a lot to prove to myself. I feel like I underachieved during my prime years. And even though it may not be my prime years, I feel like I have the best team around me and I’m surrounding myself with the best people around me, and so that gives me the chance to do the best that I can do right now. And I’m curious to see just what I can do when I have this great support system around me so that I can work so hard and know that my hard work will pay dividends, and that everybody else’s hard work is paying dividends.

I continue to fight because I stay hungry. I stay hungry because I have a lot to prove to myself because I didn’t achieve what I wanted to achieve. I’m a two-time World Champion, but I had so many more goals that I had set out for myself when I turned pro, and I’m probably not going to achieve them all, because there’s just too many and there’s not enough time, but I just want to achieve as much as I can before I call it a night.

Q

Pablo, this is obviously a big opportunity and a great opportunity for you. How has the preparation been and how do you see your fight with Paulie unfolding?

P. Cano

This is the best preparation I have ever had. I repsect Paulie tremendously, but I also feel that my youth, my strength, my motivation and my preparation will guide me to win and if I want bigger fights, I have to win this fight to go on to bigger and better fights.

Q

A question for you, is you’ve had now a couple fights how do you think moving up to welterweight, has that affected your game in a positive way or maybe in a negative way?

P. Malignaggi

Oh, I don’t think there’s really been any negatives. I don’t think I had a choice, really. I couldn’t make 140 pounds anymore. I could make it, but at the expense of having energy to fight, so really what would be the point? I think there’s only been positives, because there was nothing left. I mean, remaining at 140 pounds, I was a skeleton of myself. So the only option was to move up to Welterweight, the next weight class up from Junior Welterweight. I may not be the biggest Welterweight, but at the same time there was no other option, really.

Q

And the other question is, the fans in Brooklyn, what kind of party do they expect after you win?

P. Malignaggi

I take it one step at a time. I’m from New York so there’s a lot of parties going on, and I’ll be involved in a lot of them, but the focus remains on Cano and the focus remains on winning before thinking about any parties. Obviously, you want to look good and win in your hometown and put on a festive atmosphere for them, so that everybody can celebrate afterwards, but the focus for me is on winning the fight first.

Q

And lastly, I know you said that you don’t plan on fighting for much, much longer. Is there any eye on the prize or certain fighters that you’re looking at down the road after this fight that you wouldn’t mind challenging and taking on in the near future?

P. Malignaggi

Again, I don’t want to overlook Cano. I think all the focus has to be on him because he’s so hungry and ready and motivated. But, yes, afterwards if everything goes well here like the plan is, then, yes, the Welterweight division is packed with talent. There’s just so much going on in the Welterweight division that, like even Cano said, to get to the other big fight you’ve got to win this fight, and the same applies for me, really. In order to get to the other big fight I’ve got to win this fight. So the focus remains Cano, but obviously any top Welterweights in the world. I’m blessed and fortunate to be involved in a weight class with so much talent and there can be a lot of mixing and matching of styles and fights.

Q

You were very young, what did you learn from the loss with Erik Morales? You were very young when you fought him, but that must have given you some experience and now you’re still young and now fighting for your second world title, and what does it feel like coming in as the underdog against Paulie Malignaggi?

P. Cano

I learned a lot. As you said, I’m still very young, but I have a lot of experience. I learned a lot from the fight with Erik Morales, and that experience is what I’m bringing. I have a lot of talent, I have a lot of strengths, I’m very motivated, and that’s what I’m bringing to this fight.

Q

Have you watched videos of Paulie Malignaggi and his losses, have you learned anything in those losses, with the Hatton’s, with the Khan in those losses is there anything you picked up

P. Cano

I’ve seen a little bit of footage. There’s not too much on the Internet that I’ve been able to obtain. But we have seen a few and worked on some things in the gym. But at the end of the day that goes out the window because what unfolds inside the ring might not be what you’re preparing for. So I’m very confident in my team, in the work we’ve done, that once we step into the ring and start working on our adjustment, to make an adjustment in our plan, that you will see a very good fight and we will be victorious come October 20th.”

Q

I’m going to ask both fighters a question. Pablo, I remember the fight that you did have against Erik Morales was a very brave fight. I remember when your corner stepped in to stop the action at the end of the 10th round, you were bleeding from your eyes, and I also recall that you were a last minute replacement too for Lucas Matthysse for the fight. In that fight I know you commented already that you did learn a lot from it, but taking away and looking at Erik Morales himself, he’s on the card, do you have a lot of solidarity, do you gain a lot of faith with a champion like Erik Morales being on the card, a fellow countryman?

P. Cano

Oh, definitely it’s very motivating to be fighting. We fought, we were rivals in the ring, but outside the ring we’re friends. And, yes, I have a great honor to be fighting alongside with Erik Morales. And first, God willing, Mexico is going to take both victories that night.

Q

Thank you, Pablo, and good luck. Paulie, everybody writes you off. Every time you lose a fight, you come back, you reinvent yourself, and now here you’re at 147 pounds and you’ve got Ricky Hatton coming back into the ring. Are you looking for a possibility of you and Ricky having a rematch and getting some revenge?

P. Malignaggi

Well, obviously you can’t help but think about that kind of stuff when you get called about it, people calling you and asking you questions about it, so obviously how can I say the fight wouldn’t interest me. But again, like I said before, if I don’t get by Cano none of that’s possible, so the focus remains, from here until next Saturday, on Pablo Cesar Cano and then more discussions can follow about Ricky Hatton and so on and so forth. But really I’m motivated and totally focused on Pablo Cesar Cano at the moment.

Q

You know, Paulie, you’re probably one of the most popular boxers in New York City, and definitely you’re magical on TV, is there anywhere you can go that people don’t know who you are in New York City?

P. Malignaggi

Yes, yes, of course. I’m not Brad Pitt. But, you know –

Q

Pablo, when you fought Erik Morales you were moving up in weight at that time and it was a brawl. Now, you’re moving up in weight and you’re fighting a guy who it appears has more power than he’s had ever, at least he seems to have found some, and you’re fighting a mover, is the moving up in weight, does he see that as being a problem, and how is he going to account for Paulie’s movement?

P. Cano

We’ve been working very hard in the gym preparing for this, obviously working on strengthening and conditioning to add the additional weight, but also with the sparring, the adequate sparring and mobility and movement so we can be breaking him down round by round as the fight goes on. We’ve been working on this for the last couple of months, but obviously it’s something that has to unfold on October 20th, the night of the fight.

Q

I notice that you stopped Fidel Matorato Muniz two fights ago with a body shot. They say kill the body and the legs will follow, how critical is a body shot in your training and in your strategy?

P. Cano

It’s fundamental in a fight to work to the body from the beginning, to break him down, as you mentioned, and not only to the body. We’re going to start from the first round not only with body work, we’re going to work very hard with a variety of punches so we can minimize Paulie and eventually take the win, and win the fight.

Q

What did you take away, I’m assuming you watched his last fight where he scored the knockout, what did you take away from that fight, because that probably is the defining performance. And I know trainers say they want to watch the best fighter that they’re going to face and that was probably his defining performance and I want to know what you took away from that.

P. Cano

Yes, I did see the fight. And, as you mentioned, he’s very fast, or as you mentioned, he looks much stronger than he had in the past in other fights, and it was a brilliant performance. But I want to remind you that I am a Mexican warrior and on October 20th I’m ready for war. If he wants to box, I’ll box. If he wants to go toe-to-toe I’m ready to go toe-to-toe. But one thing I do know is I’m going to win and take the title back to Mexico.

Q

No question you’re a warrior. I saw your last fight. My final question is, boxing him, that’s going to be interesting to see because I know he’s going to be crafty. He’s also going to have the crowd behind him and I want to know, you’ve had three knockouts in your last three fights, do you think you need to get a knockout to win, or do you think you can win the decision?

P. Cano

No, I don’t want to pressure myself looking for one punch, looking for the knockout. I’m confident in the work that we’ve done, in the preparation that we’ve done, and I’m going to work round per round, and one thing I’m for sure is the work that we’ve put in. And I’m just going to go in there and do my best and know that my best is going to win the fight.

Q

Paulie, the last question for you. You heard him say if he wants to box he’ll box. When you hear that what are your thoughts? Do you see any evidence that he can box with you, or how do you see him coming at you?

P. Malignaggi

I don’t think he’s a bad boxer. I thought he was actually out-boxing Morales at the beginning of the fight when they fought. He’s got a good little technique going for himself, so I don’t think he’s a terrible boxer. But obviously I anticipate some pressure. He’s a Mexican fighter and they like the pressure and stuff like that. So, yes, we’re working on both things. I did notice he’s not a bad boxer at all, I notice he’s got some good technique going, so we’re preparing for pressure and we’re preparing for boxing. You can never just have a one-track mind or a one-track game plan, so to speak. You have to focus and prepare for quite possibly anything that could happen. And I expect a few surprises in the game for me, this is the biggest fight of his career, but at the end of the day I’m a veteran of this game, and I’m a veteran of this sport, and I’ve seen a lot, which is why I approach every fight this way and I try not to look at it from a one-track mind. I try to prepare for everything he might do and be able to counter-attack.

Q

This is his first fight at 147, it took you four fights to get to your big fight at 147, can he make this leap for this kind of a fight from 140 to 147?

P. Malignaggi

He’s at an age where you’re still growing and getting thicker and bigger, and I’m at an age where I’m not growing anymore. So he’s got a good frame and I think obviously he’s a growing kid, he just turned 23, so I don’t think moving up in weight is as much of a factor for him because at that age your body is still filling out and maturing and growing, so I think in the end he would probably end up as a Welterweight anyway. But I’m not really thinking about is it too early for him to be a Welterweight or not. I’m thinking about this is my rival, this is my opponent, and I’ve got to beat him.

R. Diaz

I would like to thank everybody, champions, Paulie, Pablo, thanks for being on the call, taking some time with us in the media. Also remind everyone Golden Boy Promotions, Barclays, and Showtime bringing it back after 80 years to Brooklyn. Don’t forget. Four world title fights, all on Showtime, not pay-per-view. Thank you everybody.

END OF CALL

World championship boxing returns to Brooklyn with an inaugural night of fights at the new Barclays Center on October 20 headlined by Unified Super Lightweight World Champion Danny “Swift” Garcia against future Hall of Famer Erik “El Terrible” Morales presented by Golden Boy Promotions and supported by Golden Boy Promotions sponsors Corona, DeWalt Tools and AT&T. In the co-featured attractions, Brooklyn’s own Paulie “Magic Man” Malignaggi puts his WBA Welterweight World Championship on the line against hard-hitting Pablo Cesar “El Demoledor” Cano, undefeated number one rated WBO middleweight contender Peter “Kid Chocolate” Quillin of Manhattan takes on unbeaten Hassan N’Dam for N’Dam’s WBO Middleweight World Championship and Devon Alexander “The Great” faces Randall Bailey for Bailey’s IBF Welterweight World Championship in a bout presented in association with DiBella Entertainment. The SHOWTIME® CHAMPIONSHIP BOXING telecast begins live at 8:00 p.m. ET/PT (delayed on the West Coast). Preliminary fights will air live on SHOWTIME EXTREME® beginning at 7:00 p.m. ET/PT (delayed on the West Coast).

Tickets priced at $300, $200, $100 and $50 are available for purchase at www.barclayscenter.com, www.ticketmaster.com, the Barclays Center box office, all Ticketmaster locations or by calling 800-745-3000.


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